Takeaways

  • An adequate systemic response to LGBTQ youth homelessness requires a sufficient understanding of their needs and the skills necessary to meet those needs. 
  • Best practices for providing safe, responsive, respectful, and affirming services to LGBTQ youth should be incorporated throughout the entire homelessness system.
  • A coordinated, community-wide homelessness system is necessary to end all forms of homelessness but especially LGBTQ homelessness.
  • An adequate systemic response to LGBTQ youth homelessness requires an accurate count of LGBTQ youth who are experiencing or at risk of experiencing homelessness.

Data

A number of cities across the U.S. make life more difficult for homeless LGBTQ youth through policies that effectively punish them for the conditions of homelessness. While such policies are widely prevalent and in some cases are growing in popularity, researchers, advocates, and even the courts are pushing back, finding that laws criminalizing homelessness are ineffective, expensive, and unconstitutional [11].

    27%

of cities in the U.S. prohibit sleeping in particular public places, such as public parks [12].

    57%

of cities in the U.S. impose bans on “camping” in particular public places.

    76%

of cities in the U.S. prohibit panhandling or “begging” in particular public places.

    65%

of cities in the U.S. prohibit panhandling or “begging” in particular public places.